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Old 05-15-2019, 12:04 PM
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Default using hi octane (and pricey) race fuel for winterization

Copied from an email regarding gas for generators, where the guy recommends spending $75 for 5 gallons of gas for your genny if it's a do or die situation. Probably applies to your Porsche that sits in the garage all winter too.

Fuel Tips: The Science of High Octane
By David S. Wallens
May 15, 2019
Higher-octane fuels are more resistant to engine knock than lower-octane options. This is why most high-performance engines require higher-octane fuels–in the simplest of terms, these fuels are more compatible with increased cylinder pressures, whether they’re due to the compression ratio, engine speed or boost pressure.
There’s another advantage of higher-octane fuels: They’re more stable when it comes to storage. To explain the science behind that fact, we’re going to crib from a post on the Sunoco Race Fuels website by Technical Specialist Zachary Santner:
“87-octane fuels tend to be less refined and contain more unstable hydrocarbons. As the months pass during storage, these unstable components react to form gums, varnishes and lower-octane hydrocarbons. As a result, the octane can decrease within months for 87-octane fuels, especially when stored under less-than-ideal conditions.
“93-octane fuels are more refined and contain more stable hydrocarbons. These stable hydrocarbons can last two to three times longer than those in 87-octane fuel. Even with proper storage, 87-octane gas can start to degrade in three months; 93-octane fuel should last closer to 9 months before degradation is noticeable. Keep in mind that 93-octane fuels are still susceptible to octane loss and vapor pressure decreases due to butane evaporation.”
So, other than cost, is there a downside to filling your tank with high-octane gas? “Filling up with premium when you don’t need it can help to clean the fuel system because it contains cleaner components than 87 octane,” Santner tells us. “No reasons to not use it, even in an 87-octane-minimum car.”
Race fuels, though, are a slightly different matter. Where street fuels are blended to meet a price point, race fuels feature better ingredients that lead to longer shelf life. If properly stored, Santner adds, Sunoco’s race fuels can sit around for two years or more without degrading.
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Old 05-15-2019, 12:57 PM
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I thought race fuels contained lead, which would kill your catalytic converter? Not sure though.
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Old 05-15-2019, 01:06 PM
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Lots of options, https://www.sunocoracefuels.com/fuels/compare-fuels
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Old 05-15-2019, 01:23 PM
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I have been under the impression that its not really the octane, but the mix with Ethanol that causes fuel system issues in, at least, older cars... same with "small engines" like mowers and snow blowers etc. That said, I always run "high octane" in the 914 regardless of season and storage time... but no way I am putting some 100 octane Cam2 in it.
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Old 05-15-2019, 01:30 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by racer View Post
I have been under the impression that its not really the octane, but the mix with Ethanol that causes fuel system issues in, at least, older cars... same with "small engines" like mowers and snow blowers etc. That said, I always run "high octane" in the 914 regardless of season and storage time... but no way I am putting some 100 octane Cam2 in it.
This. From everything I've seen/heard the biggest issue with winter storage is more water condensation than fuel breakdown. I suppose if you're storing for closer to or over a year I might worry about significant fuel breakdown, but for a few winter months I'm not sure that doing more than filling the tank and maybe adding a storage treatment (something like Stabil) is needed.
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Old 05-15-2019, 01:34 PM
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Just reality today we have to treat or use specific fuel for most engines today. DD's usually use enough to not worry but just about everything else needs some consideration. Consider yourself lucky if you havent had a fuel issue yet. Lots of tests out there but one from Practical Sailor a few years ago convinced me to treat every drop I use. I use seafoam, tested out as good as any to stabilize fuel. I like the idea of using canned fuel for small engine storage but havent yet.
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Old 05-15-2019, 02:03 PM
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I use Startron and or Stabil in boat and small engines. My local buds at Sterling Mower now said not to run 2 cycles dry over the winter.....science seems to be evolving....
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Old 05-15-2019, 02:09 PM
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Fuel stabilizing has to be cheaper and better than high octane for storage. I run regular gas in the equipment spring and summer. Late summer I start to add stabilizers to the gas so the stuff in the equipment is stabilized too. Stuff that is summer or winter only gets run out of gas at the end of the season if I remember to. The diesel gets stabilizer and biocides gas gets Stabl designed for ethanol blends. So far no issues with the many small 2 and 4 stroke motors.
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